Transitioning from high school to college

However, when I did end up on a college campus the successes and failures of the freshmen around me underscored the first year stumbling blocks that seem inherent in the migration from high school to college life. Students that catch on early to the latent lessons transition much more smoothly. Other contributing factors though are already determined: Most high school graduates have never been on their own, so freshman year is a double-edged sword.

Transitioning from high school to college

How Is College Different from High School - SMU

You will face moral and ethical decisions you have never faced before. Schedules tend to look lighter than they really are. You are expected to know those that apply to you. You will usually be told what to do and corrected if your behavior is out of line.

You are expected to take responsibility for what you do and don't do, as well as for the consequences of your decisions. You will usually be told in class what you need to learn from assigned readings.

It's up to you to read and understand the assigned material; lectures and assignments proceed from the assumption that you've already done so. Instead, to amplify the text, they may give illustrations, provide background information, or discuss research about the topic you are studying.

When professors write on the board, it may be to amplify the lecture, not to summarize it. Good notes are a must. High school is a teaching environment in which you acquire facts and skills. College is a learning environment in which you take responsibility for thinking through and applying what you have learned.

You, not the professor, need to organize the material to prepare for the test. A particular course may have only 2 or 3 tests in a semester. Mastery is usually seen as the ability to reproduce what you were taught in the form in which it was presented to you, or to solve the kinds of problems you were shown how to solve.

Mastery is often seen as the ability to apply what you've learned to new situations or to solve new kinds of problems.

These are usually "wake-up calls" to let you know what is expected--but they also may account for a substantial part of your course grade. You may be shocked when you get your grades. Courses are usually structured to reward a "good-faith effort.

Get to know your professors; they are your single greatest resource. Create your own support systems, and seek help when you realize you may need it. Take control of your time. Plan ahead to satisfy academic obligations and make room for everything else.

Think beyond the moment:The accommodations and services designated in a high school IEP or Plan are not automatically transferred to the college or university. High School Post Secondary. * Guiding principle: High school is a teaching environment in which you acquire facts and skills. * Guiding principle: College is a learning environment in which you take responsibility for thinking through and applying what you have learned.

The transition from high school to the college of your choice can be stressful too.

Transitioning from high school to college

But I’m here to help you take that stress and channel it in order to become a productive, happy, healthy contributor to your new college or university. Transitioning from High School to College: A Spotlight on Section MODULE GOALS: To provide students with an overview of Section of the Rehabilitation Act of (Workforce Investment Act) and how it protects your academic rights from high school to postsecondary education.

by Jess P. Shatkin, MD, MPH. Going to college is more than just "going back to school." The departure is a significant milestone in the life of a family and ushers in a time of separation and transition, requiring an adjustment on the part of parents, the college-bound teenager and the whole family.

Jun 22,  · As a result, most counselors are left with little time to help high school seniors prepare for the academic, social, and personal challenges associated with transitioning to college.

How to Transition from High School to College | CollegeXpress