Understanding dyslexia

Understanding Dyslexia How to help a child with dyslexia If you think your child is dyslexic, that can be a big worry. But we have two bits of good news for you: We find dyslexics can learn to read and spell fine with the right help. Dyslexia is not what you think it is.

Understanding dyslexia

A person with a learning disability has trouble processing words or numbers. Dyslexia is not a disease. It's a condition a person is born with, and it often runs in families. People with dyslexia are not stupid or lazy. Most have average or above-average intelligence, and they work very hard to overcome their learning problems.

Research has shown that dyslexia happens because of the way the brain processes information. Pictures of the brain show that when people with dyslexia read, they use different parts of the brain than people without dyslexia.

These pictures also show that the brains of people with dyslexia don't work efficiently during reading. So that's why reading seems like such slow, hard work. What Happens in Dyslexia? Most people think that dyslexia causes people to reverse letters and numbers and see words backwards.

But reversals happen as a normal part of development, and are seen in many kids until first or second grade. The main problem in dyslexia is trouble recognizing phonemes pronounced: These are the basic sounds of speech the "b" sound in "bat" is a phoneme, for example.

So it's a struggle to make the connection between the sound and the letter symbol for that sound, and to blend sounds into words. This makes it hard to recognize short, familiar words or to sound out longer words. It takes a lot of time for a person with dyslexia to sound out a word.

Because word reading takes more time and focus, the meaning of the word often is lost, and reading comprehension is poor.

Understanding dyslexia

It's not surprising that people with dyslexia have trouble spelling. They also might have trouble expressing themselves in writing and even speaking. Dyslexia is a language processing disorder, so it can affect all forms of language, spoken or written.

Some people have milder forms of dyslexia, so they may have less trouble in these other areas of spoken and written language. Some people work around their dyslexia, but it takes a lot of effort and extra work. Dyslexia isn't something that goes away on its own or that a person outgrows.The symptoms of dyslexia can be hard to spot until your child starts school.

A teacher might be the first one to notice the signs, especially if your child struggles to read, spell, and follow. Understanding Dyslexia.

How to help a child with dyslexia. If you think your child is dyslexic, that can be a big worry. But we have two bits of good news for you: 1.

We find dyslexics can learn to read and spell fine with the right help. 2. Dyslexia is not what you think it is. > Understanding Dyslexia > A Dyslexic Child in the Classroom.

A Dyslexic Child in the Classroom. A Guide for Teachers and Parents. () A Dyslexic Child in the Classroom. Davis Dyslexia Association International, urbanagricultureinitiative.com View / Download PDF of this article.

Share this page! comments «Older Comments. Patrick S. October Dyslexia can result in frustration, embarrassment, avoidance and low self-esteem as a result of difficulties performing tasks that seem to come naturally to others.

Demystifying the learning disorder with your child can help him develop the tools — and resilience — necessary to manage it, both in school and in social circumstances. Understanding dyslexia This free course is available to start right now. Review the full course description and key learning outcomes and create an account and enrol if .

Dyslexia shows itself in different ways and can involve a number of reading challenges. There is no official list of dyslexia types. Some types are more widely recognized than others. Knowing what type of dyslexia kids have can help professionals come up with the best teaching strategies.

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Understanding Dyslexia – Dyslexia the Gift